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Thomas Stanley and William Danko wrote a book entitled:
The Millionaire Next Door … The Surprising Secrets of America’s Wealthy”.
They produced a portrait of who America’s millionaires are and show that by and large these are quiet, understated, self-reliant Americans who are committed to hard work, education, and family.
Their portrait shows that eighty percent of our millionaires are first generation affluent, that less than half received not a cent of inheritance, and only 19% get any income from a trust fund or estate.

Most Americans … 80% … are not self-employed … of those that are, two thirds are our millionaires.

Seventy five percent of these self-employed millionaires are entrepreneurs, and the remaining quarter are self-employed professionals like doctors and accounts.
Sure, we have high profile billionaires in America, however most of our millionaires are the nation’s bread and butter entrepreneurs and small business owners with annual incomes near $250,000.
These are overwhelmingly self-made individuals, by a large founders and proprietors of prosaic businesses like: welding contractors, auctioneers, rice farmers, owners of mobile-home parks, pest controllers, coin and stamp dealers, paving contractors, etc.
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Great Decisions
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By Marcia W. Blenko, Michael C. Mankins and Paul Rogers

Some decisions clearly stand out as important. They’re the big, high-value strategic choices made in every part of the organization. Senior leaders decide whether to make a big acquisition. IT decides whether to invest in a major systems upgrade.

But many organizations overlook a second category that can be equally significant: operating decisions that seem small but that are made and remade frequently and generate a lot of value over time. Most companies have a similar set of decisions made day in and day out by people close to the frontlines of the business.

To identify the key decisions in these two categories, you can use a tool we call decision architecture that we describe in our book, Decide & Deliver, and on the website www.decide-deliver.com. The result is a list of your critical decisions?the top 20 or 30 decisions that must work well for the business to succeed. Once you know your critical decisions, you can identify how well they are working and take the right actions to improve them.

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